May 30, 2007

Ireland

Ireland: Another excerpt from my upcoming review of the Irish film "Once" in The American Conservative:

"Once" is set among the marginally employed in prosperous contemporary Dublin, thronged by immigrants. It's gladdening to see long-suffering Ireland, which sent forth her hungry children to the ends of the earth, now wealthy enough to attract the poor of the world. And yet, watching Ireland hurrying toward a postmodern Euro-blandness in which it becomes so diverse that it's just like everywhere else in Europe, I fear we'll miss the Irish Ireland when we eventually realize its gone.


My published articles are archived at iSteve.com -- Steve Sailer

3 comments:

jiminykrikit said...

...watching Ireland hurrying toward a postmodern Euro-blandness in which it becomes so diverse that it's just like everywhere else in Europe

Don't worry: the diverse mainland has been far from bland. Just recently we've had:

* 16-year-old Mary-Ann Leneghan tortured and raped over several hours by five blacks and a failed Albanian asylum-seeker, then stabbed to death in a public park

* 15-year-old Kriss Donald snatched at random in broad daylight by a gang of Pakistani gangstas, driven 200 miles, then stabbed, soaked in gasoline, set on fire and left to die in a ditch.

* 14-year-old Charlene Downes allegedly murdered and put into kebabs by her Muslim immigrant "lovers".

* A string of black-on-black teenage murders in London.

Plus the on-going toll of less strenuous murder and rape of whites by our vibrant in-comers, whose numbers have been recently swollen by lots and lots of refugees from Somalia. Trust me: "blandness" will not be one of Ireland's problems either.

Anonymous said...

So why Jimmy do the Irish put up with this?

Anonymous said...

I visited Ireland a few years back. When one of my Irish friends got wind of my illegal immigration anxieties from back home, he promptly took me to the Kennedy museum/shrine then to a replica of one of the ships the Irish boarded to emigrate to America.

The field trip was to have been self-explanatory I guess, me thoroughly chastized for my hypocrisy at being descended from immigrants myself. A few days later I caught a Cuban-American sitcom that the BBC Ireland had imported from Florida I guess. By the weeks end I had stopped for a bite to eat at a restaurant where they were serving fa gee tahs. I kept a straight face and ordered two. They weren't bad.