April 10, 2007

Question of the Day

My son wants to know:


"What happens if Al Sharpton won't forgive you, but Jesse Jackson will?"


Whose sin-forgiving superpowers are stronger?


My published articles are archived at iSteve.com -- Steve Sailer

18 comments:

rast said...

Jesse Jackson's powers are definitely stronger; after all, he is the emperor of all black people.

tommy said...

I agree with rast. Sharpton's powers cannot possibly compare to those of the Supreme Ultimate Rainbow Warrior.

Michael Farris said...

I was leaning toward Jackson, but although he has a lot more credibility among white people, I'm not sure who black people respect more. I wouldn't be surprised if Sharpton's confrontationality(?) doesn't carry more weight than Jackson's occasional appeals for forgiveness.

Anonymous said...

Al Sharpton has the power to incite arson and pogroms, so I say he is stronger.

Anonymous said...

Neither is a priest, so they don't have the power to forgive!

Now, if I had to choose which would bless or pray for me?

Jackson, easily.

I don't think he got the credit he deserved from the Conservative/Pro-life community when he went down to be with the Schindler family during the Terri Schiavo starving. He did this despite it being vastly unpopular with Liberals and all the media coverage was intensely unfavorable to any on her family's side. Yet, he did it anyway. The hugs he shared with them and the emotion on his face when he was with them were as real and genuine as anything I've ever seen and I'll never forget it.

Anonymous said...

Forget absolution, your son should be asking for an Anheuser Busch distribution deal! You gotta go to Jackson for that one.

Anonymous said...

What if Michael Jackson is willing to forgive you?

Ron Guhname said...

Don't blaspheme: only the MLK above can forgive sins.

Udolpho said...

Jackson rushing to get in front of a bunch of cameras, yeah he must have really felt the goodness stir inside him, Luke.

Jesus, you are gullible.

Anonymous said...

Walter Williams' forgiveness is all I need.

tommy said...

The Messiah of the Windy City may be the only true source of absolution in this crazy, mixed-up world of ours.

Anonymous said...

I think that if a white person wants to participate in the race debate, he should have interacted socially (not by playing sports, however) with a regular (i.e. non-law grad or similar) black person, 1 on 1, for at least 1 hour...at some point in his life. I doubt if Imus has done this.

Shouting Thomas said...

Hell, anonymous, I screwed several black women. One was a secretary, another a lawyer, ande another... hell I don't even know.

Does that qualify me, dimwit?

Darwinian Individualist said...

A reader wrote about Mr. Walter E. Williams forgiveness.

Here it is:

http://www.gmu.edu/departments/economics/wew/gift.html

Anonymous said...

It's instructive to compare the Imus story, getting so much attention in the media, with another story, that doesn't appear to be as popular as it was a year ago when it was getting Imus levels of attention for some mysterious reason.

- steve reader

Svigor said...

A better question might've been, "do apologies by whites to black race hucksters result in forgiveness?"

AFAICT, they don't; they result in the next step in the panhandling game.

dilys said...

I've heard several people close to the situations say Jackson is superior / inspired in a pastoral role. Maybe he sold out his true calling for the pottage of money and race power.

How sad, if so.

Steve Sailer said...

My recollection is that the Rev. Jesse was a pretty positive force in the 1970s, when he concentrated on preaching black self-improvement: stay in school, don't do drugs, that kind of thing.

My favorite Rev. Al story is that civil rights leaders sent the very young Rev. to meet with James Brown, Soul Brother Number One, to persuade the singer to give up his straightened hair-do and switch to an Afro. Instead, the Hardest Working Man in Showbiz wowed the young Al, who ever since has had a processed conk in tribute.